Monday, January 26, 2015

Difference Between Transgender & Transsexual

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Difference Between Transgender & Transsexual
Multiple Responses:
1.
Earlier this year, Facebook created a stir when it added 50 gender options for its billions of users. Collectively, the terms reveal the company’s recognition of a diversity of possible gender identities and gender presentations. For many people, it raised questions about the terms of identity and inspired some to ask: What is the difference between transsexual and transgender?

Transsexuals are people who transition from one sex to another. A person born as a male can become recognizably female through the use of hormones and/or surgical procedures; and a person born as a female can become recognizably male. That said, transsexuals are unable to change their genetics and cannot acquire the reproductive abilities of the sex to which they transition. Sex is assigned at birth and refers to a person’s biological status as male or female. In other words, sex refers exclusively to the biological features: chromosomes, the balance of hormones, and internal and external anatomy. Each of us is born as either male or female, with rare exceptions of those born intersex who may display characteristics of both sexes at birth.
Transgender, unlike transsexual, is a term for people whose identity, expression, behavior, or general sense of self does not conform to what is usually associated with the sex they were born in the place they were born. It is often said sex is a matter of the body, while gender occurs in the mind. Gender is an internal sense of being male, female, or other. People often use binary terms, for instance, masculine or feminine, to describe gender just as they do when referring to sex. But gender is more complex and encompasses more than just two possibilities. Gender also is influenced by culture, class, and race because behavior, activities, and attributes seen as appropriate in one society or group may be viewed otherwise in another.

Transgender, then, unlike transsexual is a multifaceted term. One example of a transgendered person might be a man who is attracted to women but also identifies as a cross-dresser. Other examples include people who consider themselves gender nonconforming, multi gendered, androgynous, third gender, and two-spirit people. All of these definitions are inexact and vary from person to person, yet each of them includes a sense of blending or alternating the binary concepts of masculinity and femininity. Some people using these terms simply see the traditional concepts as restrictive. Less than one percent of all adults identify as transgender.

Gender identity and sexual orientation are not the same. Sexual orientation, according to the American Psychological Association, refers to an individual’s enduring physical, romantic, and/or emotional attraction to another person. Transgender people may be straight, bisexual, lesbian, gay, or asexual. Biological factors such as prenatal hormone levels, genetics, and early childhood experiences may all contribute to the development of a transgender identity, according to some researchers.

A significant shift occurred late in 2012, when the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (or the DSM-5) officially changed the term “gender identity disorder” to “gender dysphoria,” to describe the emotional distress that can result from “a marked incongruence between one’s experienced/expressed gender and assigned gender.” In 1973, homosexuality was similarly declassified as a mental disorder. The current change suggests an evolution of thought on the matter of gender that may influence not only how many people see themselves, but also how they are perceived by others.

No matter how they label themselves, many people do not entirely conform to a single, rigid gender definition with most people having traits that don't exactly fit the profile. Even more importantly, some of the traditional gender differences between men and women may be slight. Due to changes in social attitudes, general changes in the perception of gender also occurs over time. A trait considered masculine in one generation may be a feminine norm in the next. A woman wearing pants, for instance, would have been considered manly at one time. And though it may have been unusual in the not-too-distant past, many women earn equal to or more than their husbands today, while their husbands perform more of the household and childcare duties once assigned to women. Ultimately, gender is a shifting ground on which each of us stands.

2.
Transgender and Transsexual are individuals who do not identify with the sex they are born into. "Transgender" individuals feel a lack of fit between their own internal gender and the gender roles made by their society. Some transgender people's sense of difference is so strong that they identify as "transsexual," someone who believes their assigned sex at birth is wrong and their correct sex is one that aligns with their internal feelings.



Transgender
Transsexual
Definition
An umbrella term that refers to those with identities that cross over, move between, or otherwise challenge the socially constructed border between the genders. While this can include medical or social transition, it may not.
A term referring to a person who does not identify with the sex they were assigned at birth and wishes, whether successful or not, to realign their gender and their sex through use of medical intervention.
Surgery
Usually do not get surgery.
Often, if available to the person, however it completely depends on the person.
Medical Condition
While no consistent diagnoses is given to transgender people, some may qualify for a diagnosis under Gender Dysphoria or Intersex conditions.
DSM-V labels transsexual people Gender Dysphoric, a label contested by many trans people who say the problem is physical, not mental. Typically medical and/or surgical intervention to align one's sex and gender aids in feeling of dysphoria
Additional Conditions
Due to the societal pressure to conform, some transgender people can experience depression, anxiety, panic, substance abuse issues, and/or suicidal ideations.
Due to the societal pressure to conform, some transsexual people can experience depression, anxiety, panic, substance abuse issues, suicidal ideations and/or social isolation.
Sexual orientation
Typically not relevant. Therefore transgender people can be straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, asexual, pansexual, etc.
Typically not relevant. Therefore transsexual people can be straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, asexual, pansexual, etc.
Differences in Sexual Orientation
Transgender people of all kinds, including transsexual people, can be gay, lesbian, bisexual, or asexual. Sexual orientation is not linked to gender identity. A transsexual person who undergoes gender reassignment surgery may be perceived as having an orientation change if they go from being interested in the "same" gender to the "opposite" gender or vice versa because of their own transition.

Categories
The definition of transgender is very ambiguous and may fall into overlapping categories like cross-dressers/transvestites (an outdated term considered offensive by some), androgynes and genderqueers.

Transsexual condition is very well defined and can be diagnosed medically. There is medical help available, if the individual is eager to change one’s physical appearance.

Community or Symbol
The transgender community is symbolized by a pride flag which consists of pink and blue horizontal stripes on both ends, symbolizing transition. Another symbol for transgender people is the butterfly symbolizing metamorphosis. There is, however, no separate symbol for transsexuals.

Medical Intervention
Some transgender individuals opt for medical intervention to change their appearance. Those that fall within the transsexual subsection of the transgender community are more likely to opt for such changes. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is available for both trans men and trans women to promote masculine and feminine attributes respectively.

Surgical procedures are also available to remove ovaries, Fallopian tubes, the uterus in trans men and make adequate changes in the chest and genitalia. Similarly, in trans women, appropriate changes are made to the face, throat, chest, waist, buttocks and genitalia along with excess hair removal.

Legal Aspects
Depending on the person's state or country of residence, a legal change of name or gender change may be allowed only if the individual is diagnosed with gender identity disorder (GIS) indicating distress. Prior to making these legal changes, a letter from the physician to confirm the diagnosis may be required. Some jurisdictions require full surgical reassignment before a change of gender is allowed on official documents, while others less restrictive rules. Some do not allow a change in legal documents at any time.

Transsexuals who undergo surgery may face discrimination at work and health insurance issues after the change.

Religious Views
Different religions have their own views about transgender and transsexual individuals, and not all religions are tolerant toward this community. There is no clear distinction of the two terms in religious texts, and, though most religions have condemned trans behavior, there are cultures and traditions that promote acceptance in some parts of the world, religion notwithstanding.

3.
“'Transgender' describes a person, male or female, who dresses, behaves or presents themselves in a way that is different from their gender norm. Transgender includes transvestites/crossdressers, Drag Queens/Kings, androgynes and genderqueers. It does NOT include transsexual people.

'Transsexual' describes a person, male or female, born with a congenital neurological intersex condition (Benjamin's syndrome). Although transsexualism almost always requires some form of medical intervention up to and including genital surgery, it is not defined by, nor restricted to, that treatment.”

4.
“How about instead of opinions we just post the definitions? Instead of interpreting them ourselves. I am a transsexual woman and its not because of a physical birth defect!!!

Transgender:
An umbrella term that refers to those with identities that cross over, move between, or otherwise challenge the socially constructed border between the genders. While this can include medical or social transition, it may not.

Transsexual:
A term referring to a person who does not identify with the sex they were assigned at birth and wishes, whether successful or not, to realign their gender and their sex through use of medical intervention.”

5.
“There are three main classes of people that do not conform to their birth gender.

1) Gender Nonconformity - Ex. (sissy / nelly [historically fairy] ) (tomboy / butch) depending on sexual orientation

People who innately identify with their birth sex but frequently behave in a manner that is usually associated almost exclusively with the opposite sex. This behavior is probably innate.

2) Gender Ambiguity (transgender) - Ex. many cross-dressers, bi-gender, gender queer, drag queen, drag king, androgyn, transgenderist (derogatorily known as she-male for a person who lives as a women with a male sex organ that uses it sexually or he-she for the opposite, a person who lives as a man with a female sex organ that uses it sexually)

People who do not identify with either sex consistantly and exclusively.

Note: Many people mistakenly use the term "he-she" for male to female transgenderists and transsexuals.

3) Opposite Birth Sex Gender Conformity (transsexualism) -

A person who thinks, feels and acts (if safe to do so) like a member of the opposite birth sex, especially psychosexually.

Note:Transsexuals will usually seek sex reassignment surgery if they can afford it, are in physical condition to undergo the operation, can legally obtain the surgery in the country of residence or are able to leave that country.”

6.
People who identify as transgender or transsexual are usually people who are born with typical male or female anatomies but feel as though they’ve been born into the “wrong body.” For example, a person who identifies as transgender or transsexual may have typical female anatomy but feel like a male and seek to become male by taking hormones or electing to have sex reassignment surgeries.

People who have intersex conditions have anatomy that is not considered typically male or female. Most people with intersex conditions come to medical attention because doctors or parents notice something unusual about their bodies. In contrast, people who are transgendered have an internal experience of gender identity that is different from most people.

Many people confuse transgender and transsexual people with people with intersex conditions because they see two groups of people who would like to choose their own gender identity and sometimes those choices require hormonal treatments and/or surgery. These are similarities. It’s also true, albeit rare, that some people who have intersex conditions also decide to change genders at some point in their life, so some people with intersex conditions might also identify themselves as transgender or transsexual.

In spite of these similarities, these two groups should not be and cannot be thought of as one. The truth is that the vast majority of people with intersex conditions identify as male or female rather than transgender or transsexual. Thus, where all people who identify as transgender or transsexual experience problems with their gender identity, only a small portion of intersex people experience these problems.

It’s also important to understand the differences between these two groups because in spite of some similarities they face many different struggles, including different forms of discrimination. The differences between transgender and transsexual and intersex have been understood by lawmakers in countries such as Australia where lawmakers have publicly acknowledged that people with intersex conditions have distinct needs from people who identify as transgender or transsexual.

People who identify as transgender or transsexual also face discrimination and deserve equality. We also believe that people with intersex conditions and folks who identify as transgender or transsexual can and should continue to work together on human rights issues; however, there are important differences to keep in mind so that both groups can work toward a better future.

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