Monday, July 6, 2015

Central Nervous System

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Central Nervous System
Multiple Responses:
1.
The central nervous system (CNS) is the part of the nervous system consisting of the brain and spinal cord. The central nervous system is so named because it integrates information it receives from, and coordinates and influences the activity of, all parts of the bodies of bilaterally symmetric animals — that is, all multicellular animals except sponges and radially symmetric animals such as jellyfish — and it contains the majority of the nervous system. Arguably, many consider the retina and the optic nerve (2nd cranial nerve), as well as the olfactory nerves (1st) and olfactory epithelium as parts of the CNS, synapsing directly on brain tissue without intermediate ganglia. Following this classification the olfactory epithelium is the only central nervous tissue in direct contact with the environment, which opens up for therapeutic treatments. The CNS is contained within the dorsal body cavity, with the brain housed in the cranial cavity and the spinal cord in the spinal canal. In vertebrates, the brain is protected by the skull, while the spinal cord is protected by the vertebrae, both enclosed in the meninges.

2.
The central nervous system (CNS) controls most functions of the body and mind. It consists of two parts: the brain and the spinal cord. The brain is the center of our thoughts, the interpreter of our external environment, and the origin of control over body movement. Like a central computer, it interprets information from our eyes (sight), ears (sound), nose (smell), tongue (taste), and skin (touch), as well as from internal organs such as the stomach.

The spinal cord is the highway for communication between the body and the brain. When the spinal cord is injured, the exchange of information between the brain and other parts of the body is disrupted.

3.
This page outlines the basic physiology of the central nervous system, including the brain and spinal cord. Separate pages describe the nervous system in general, sensation, control of skeletal muscle and control of internal organs.

The central nervous system CNS is responsible for integrating sensory information and responding accordingly. It consists of two main components:
The spinal cord serves as a conduit for signals between the brain and the rest of the body. It also controls simple musculoskeletal reflexes without input from the brain.

The brain is responsible for integrating most sensory information and coordinating body function, both consciously and unconsciously. Complex functions such as thinking and feeling as well as regulation of homeostasis are attributable to different parts of the brain.

The brain and spinal cord share some key anatomic features:

Living nervous tissue has the consistency of jelly and requires special protection from physical damage. The entire CNS is encased in bone. The brain is within the cranium, while the spinal cord runs within a canal through the vertebrae.

Within its bony case, the entire CNS is bathed in a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a colorless fluid produced by special structures in the brain. CSF provides a special chemical environment for nervous tissue, as well as an additional buffer against physical damage.

The special chemical environment of nervous tissue is maintained by the relatively impermeable membranes of capillaries in the CNS. This feature is known as the blood-brain barrier.

There are two general types of tissue in the CNS:
Gray matter consists of nerve cell bodies, dendrites, and axons. Neurons in gray matter organize either in layers, as in the cerebral cortex, or as clusters called nuclei.

White matter consists mostly of axons, causing it to look white due to the myelin sheathing of the axons.

In the early embryo, the CNS forms as a relatively uniform tube. The major regions of the brain develop as enlargements at the head end of this tube:

The medulla oblongata appears as a swelling at the upper end of the spinal cord. Besides being a conduit for fibers running between the spinal cord and higher regions of the brain, it contains control centers for involuntary functions such as blood pressure, breathing, swallowing and vomiting.

Just above the medulla are the pons and cerebellum. The pons relays information between higher regions of the brain and the cerebellum, which processes sensory information and helps coordinate movement.

The next segment, the midbrain, is primarily responsible for eye movement.

Above the midbrain lies the diencephalon, which is composed of two major parts:

The thalamus processes and integrates all sensory information going to the higher regions of the brain.

The hypothalamus is critical for homeostasis, the maintenance of the body's internal environment. It influences nervous control of all internal organs and also serves as the master regulator of endocrine function by its control over the pituitary gland.

The highest region of the brain is the cerebrum, which includes both the cerebral cortex that is visible on the outside of the brain as well as other internal structures. The cerebrum is responsible for conscious sensation and voluntary movement, as well as advanced functions such as thinking, learning and emotion.

4.
The nervous system consists of the brain, spinal cord, and a complex network of neurons. This system is responsible for sending, receiving, and interpreting information from all parts of the body. The nervous system monitors and coordinates internal organ function and responds to changes in the external environment. This system can be divided into two parts: the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system.

Let's take a look at the central nervous system.

Central Nervous System
The central nervous system (CNS) is the processing center for the nervous system. It receives information from and sends information to the peripheral nervous system. The two main organs of the CNS are the brain and spinal cord. The brain processes and interprets sensory information sent from the spinal cord. Both the brain and spinal cord are protected by three layers of connective tissue called the meninges.

Within the central nervous system is a system of hollow cavities called ventricles. The network of linked cavities in the brain (cerebral ventricles) is continuous with the central canal of the spinal cord. The ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid which is produced by specialized epithelium located within the ventricles called the choroid plexus. Cerebrospinal fluid surrounds, cushions, and protects the brain and spinal cord from trauma. It also assists in the circulation of nutrients to the brain.

Central Nervous System: Brain
The brain is the control center of the body. It consists of three main components: the forebrain, the brainstem, and the hindbrain. The forebrain is responsible for a variety of functions including receiving and processing sensory information, thinking, perceiving, producing and understanding language, and controlling motor function. The forebrain contains structures such as the thalamus and hypothalamus which are responsible for such functions as motor control, relaying sensory information, and controlling autonomic functions. It also contains the largest part of the brain, the cerebrum. Most of the actual information processing in the brain takes place in the cerebral cortex.

The midbrain and the hindbrain together make up the brainstem. The midbrain is the portion of the brainstem that connects the hindbrain and the forebrain. This region of the brain is involved in auditory and visual responses as well as motor function.

The hindbrain extends from the spinal cord and contains structures such as the pons and cerebellum. These regions assist in maintaining balance and equilibrium, movement coordination, and the conduction of sensory information. The hindbrain also contains the medulla oblongata which is responsible for controlling such autonomic functions as breathing, heart rate, and digestion.

Central Nervous System: Spinal Cord
The spinal cord is a cylindrical shaped bundle of nerve fibers that is connected to the brain. The spinal cord runs down the center of the protective spinal column extending from the neck to the lower back. Spinal cord nerves transmit information from body organs and external stimuli to the brain and send information from the brain to other areas of the body. The nerves of the spinal cord are grouped into bundles of nerve fibers that travel in two pathways. Ascending nerve tracts carry sensory information from the body to the brain. Descending nerve tracts send information pertaining to motor function from the brain to the rest of the body.

Central Nervous System: Neurons

Neurons are the basic unit of the nervous system. All cells of the nervous system are comprised of neurons. Neurons contain nerve processes which are "finger-like" projections that extend from the nerve cell body. The nerve processes consist of axons and dendrites which are able to conduct and transmit signals. Axons typically carry signals away from the cell body. They are long nerve processes that may branch out to convey signals to various areas. Dendrites typically carry signals toward the cell body. They are usually more numerous, shorter and more branched than axons. Axons and dendrites are bundled together into what are called nerves. These nerves send signals between the brain, spinal cord, and other body organs via nerve impulses. Neurons are classified as either motor, sensory, or interneurons. Motor neurons carry information from the central nervous system to organs, glands, and muscles. Sensory neurons send information to the central nervous system from internal organs or from external stimuli. Interneurons relay signals between motor and sensory neurons.

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