Monday, August 1, 2016

Magnetic Field

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Magnetic Field
Multiple Responses
1.
A magnetic field is the magnetic effect of electric currents and magnetic materials. The magnetic field at any given point is specified by both a direction and a magnitude (or strength); as such it is a vector field. The term is used for two distinct but closely related fields denoted by the symbols B and H, where H is measured in units of amperes per meter (symbol: A·m−1 or A/m) in the SI. B is measured in teslas (symbol:T) and newtons per meter per ampere(symbol: N·m−1·A−1 or N/(m·A)) in the SI. B is most commonly defined in terms of the Lorentz force it exerts on moving electric charges.

Magnetic fields can be produced by moving electric charges and the intrinsic magnetic moments of elementary particles associated with a fundamental quantum property, their spin. In special relativity, electric and magnetic fields are two interrelated aspects of a single object, called the electromagnetic tensor; the split of this tensor into electric and magnetic fields depends on the relative velocity of the observer and charge. In quantum physics, the electromagnetic field is quantized and electromagnetic interactions result from the exchange of photons.

In everyday life, magnetic fields are most often encountered as a force created by permanent magnets, which pull on ferromagnetic materials such as iron, cobalt, or nickel, and attract or repel other magnets. Magnetic fields are widely used throughout modern technology, particularly in electrical engineering and electromechanics. The Earth produces its own magnetic field, which is important in navigation, and it shields the Earth's atmosphere from solar wind. Rotating magnetic fields are used in both electric motors and generators. Magnetic forces give information about the charge carriers in a material through the Hall effect. The interaction of magnetic fields in electric devices such as transformers is studied in the discipline of magnetic circuits.

2.
A magnetic field is generated when electric charge carriers such as electrons move through space or within an electrical conductor. The geometric shapes of the magnetic flux lines produced by moving charge carriers (electric current) are similar to the shapes of the flux lines in an electrostatic field. But there are differences in the ways electrostatic and magnetic fields interact with the environment.

Electrostatic flux is impeded or blocked by metallic objects. Magnetic flux passes through most metals with little or no effect, with certain exceptions, notably iron and nickel. These two metals, and alloys and mixtures containing them, are known as ferromagnetic materials because they concentrate magnetic lines of flux. An electromagnet provides a good example. An air-core coil carrying direct current produces a magnetic field. If an iron core is substituted for the air core in a given coil, the intensity of the magnetic field is greatly increased in the immediate vicinity of the coil. If the coil has many turns and carries a large current, and if the core material has exceptional ferromagnetic properties, the flux density near the ends of the core (the poles of the magnet) can be such that the electromagnet can be used to pick up and move cars.

When charge carriers are accelerated (as opposed to moving at constant velocity), a fluctuating magnetic field is produced. This generates a fluctuating electric field, which in turn produces another varying magnetic field. The result is a "leapfrog" effect, in which both fields can propagate over vast distances through space. Such a synergistic field is known as an electromagnetic field. This is the phenomenon that makes wireless communications and broadcasting possible.

3.
Magnetic Field
Magnetic fields are produced by electric currents, which can be macroscopic currents in wires, or microscopic currents associated with electrons in atomic orbits. The magnetic field B is defined in terms of force on moving charge in the Lorentz force law. The interaction of magnetic field with charge leads to many practical applications. Magnetic field sources are essentially dipolar in nature, having a north and south magnetic pole. The SI unit for magnetic field is the Tesla, which can be seen from the magnetic part of the Lorentz force law Fmagnetic = qvB to be composed of (Newton x second)/(Coulomb x meter). A smaller magnetic field unit is the Gauss (1 Tesla = 10,000 Gauss).

4.
Magnetic field, region in the neighbourhood of a magnet, electric current, or changing electric field, in which magnetic forces are observable. Magnetic fields such as that of the Earth cause magnetic compass needles and other permanent magnets to line up in the direction of the field. Magnetic fields force moving electrically charged particles in a circular or helical path. This force—exerted on electric currents in wires in a magnetic field—underlies the operation of electric motors.

Around a permanent magnet or a wire carrying a steady electric current in one direction, the magnetic field is stationary and referred to as a magnetostatic field. At any given point its magnitude and direction remain the same. Around an alternating current or a fluctuating direct current, the magnetic field is continuously changing its magnitude and direction.

Magnetic fields may be represented by continuous lines of force or magnetic flux that emerge from north-seeking magnetic poles and enter south-seeking magnetic poles. The density of the lines indicates the magnitude of the magnetic field. At the poles of a magnet, for example, where the magnetic field is strong, the field lines are crowded together, or more dense. Farther away, where the magnetic field is weak, they fan out, becoming less dense. A uniform magnetic field is represented by equally spaced parallel straight lines. The direction of the flux is the direction in which the north-seeking pole of a small magnet points. The lines of flux are continuous, forming closed loops. For a bar magnet, they emerge from the north-seeking pole, fan out and around, enter the magnet at the south-seeking pole, and continue through the magnet to the north pole, where they again emerge. The SI unit for magnetic flux is the weber. The number of webers is a measure of the total number of field lines that cross a given area.

Magnetic fields may be represented mathematically by quantities called vectors that have direction as well as magnitude. Two different vectors are in use to represent a magnetic field: one called magnetic flux density, or magnetic induction, is symbolized by B; the other, called the magnetic field strength, or magnetic field intensity, is symbolized by H. The magnetic field H might be thought of as the magnetic field produced by the flow of current in wires and the magnetic field B as the total magnetic field including also the contribution made by the magnetic properties of the materials in the field. When a current flows in a wire wrapped on a soft-iron cylinder, the magnetizing field H is quite weak, but the actual average magnetic field (B) within the iron may be thousands of times stronger because B is greatly enhanced by the alignment of the iron’s myriad tiny natural atomic magnets in the direction of the field.

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