Thursday, October 13, 2016

Anaconda

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Anaconda
Multiple Responses
1.
An anaconda is a large, non-venomous snake found in tropical South America. Although the name applies to a group of snakes, it is often used to refer only to one species in particular, the common or green anaconda, Eunectes murinus, which is one of the largest snakes in the world.

Anaconda may refer to:
  • Any member of the genus Eunectes, a group of large, aquatic snakes found in South America
    • Eunectes murinus, the green anaconda, the largest species, is found east of the Andes in Colombia, Venezuela, the Guianas, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Brazil and Trinidad and Tobago.
    • Eunectes notaeus, the yellow anaconda, a small species, is found in eastern Bolivia, southern Brazil, Paraguay and northeastern Argentina.
    • Eunectes deschauenseei, the darkly-spotted anaconda, is a rare species found in northeastern Brazil and coastal French Guiana.
    • Eunectes beniensis, the Bolivian anaconda, the most recently defined species, is found in the Departments of Beni and Pando in Bolivia.
  • The giant anaconda is a mythical snake of enormous proportions said to be found in South America.
  • Any large snake that "constricts" its prey (see Constriction), if applied loosely, could be called anaconda.

2.
Anacondas make their home in the Amazon jungles of South America and are part of the Boa Constrictor family.  Anacondas live near rivers, lakes and swamps and like to live alone.  Water is their main escape method when confronted with danger. Rather than attacking they will choose to slide into the water unnoticed, if possible.

Anacondas eat amphibious animals, like frogs & toads, as well as fish, caiman, birds, ducks and turtles.

The average size of one of these snake-giants is 6.1 m (20 feet) long and 148.5 kg. (300 pounds)!

Anacondas give birth to live young, around 24-35 at a time. Anacondas are very difficult for scientists to study or even find.  They are really quiet and leave no trail.  They spend a lot of their time in the dark waters of their habitat.

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