Sunday, April 2, 2017

Biodegradation

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Biodegradation
Multiple Responses
1.
Biodegradation is the disintegration of materials by bacteria, fungi, or other biological means. Although often conflated, biodegradable is distinct in meaning from compostable. While biodegradable simply means to be consumed by microorganisms, "compostable" makes the specific demand that the object break down under composting conditions. The term is often used in relation to ecology, waste management, biomedicine, and the natural environment (bioremediation) and is now commonly associated with environmentally friendly products that are capable of decomposing back into natural elements. Organic material can be degraded aerobically with oxygen, or anaerobically, without oxygen. Biosurfactant, an extracellular surfactant secreted by microorganisms, enhances the biodegradation process.

Biodegradable matter is generally organic material that serves as a nutrient for microorganisms. Microorganisms are so numerous and diverse that, a huge range of compounds are biodegraded, including hydrocarbons(e.g. oil), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pharmaceutical substances. Decomposition of biodegradable substances may include both biological and abiotic steps.

2.
What is Biodegradation?
The United States Environmental Protection Agency defines biodegradation as, “A process by which microbial organisms transform or alter (through metabolic or enzymatic action) the structure of chemicals introduced into the environment.”

Basically, organic (carbon-based) material is changed through chemical processes from complex molecules into simpler molecules, eventually returning the molecules into the environment. For example, a banana peel can be reduced from cellulose to water, carbon dioxide gas, and humus in a compost pile.

What Makes Biodegradation Important?
Biodegradation is nature’s waste management and recycling system. It breaks down everything from yard waste to crude oil. It is a natural process necessary to keep our planet clean and healthy.

Unfortunately, the rate at which we are producing waste far outpaces the rate of natural biodegradation, making our current state unsustainable. As a result, landfills have been filling up at record rates, and air, water and soil pollution is increasing.

3.
Breaking down of certain substances by the action of bacteria, air, water, and sunlight.

4.
Biodegradation
Biodegradation is nature's way of recycling wastes, or breaking down organic matter into nutrients that can be used by other organisms. "Degradation" means decay, and the "bio-" prefix means that the decay is carried out by a huge assortment of bacteria, fungi, insects, worms, and other organisms that eat dead material and recycle it into new forms.

In nature, there is no waste because everything gets recycled. The waste products from one organism become the food for others, providing nutrients and energy while breaking down the waste organic matter. Some organic materials will break down much faster than others, but all will eventually decay.

By harnessing these natural forces of biodegradation, people can reduce wastes and clean up some types of environmental contaminants. Through composting, we accelerate natural biodegradation and convert organic wastes to a valuable resource. Wastewater treatment also accelerates natural forces of biodegradation. In this case the purpose is to break down organic matter so that it will not cause pollution problems when the water is released into the environment. Through bioremediation, microorganisms are used to clean up oil spills and other types of organic pollution. Composting and bioremediation provide many possibililites for student research.

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